Philosophy of Education

Should Educational Experiences Be “Satisfying”?

By Zachary Fruhling October 25, 2019

Nineteenth-century British moral philosopher John Stuart Mill famously said, “It is better to be a human being dissatisfied than a pig satisfied; better to be Socrates dissatisfied than a fool satisfied.” — John Stuart Mill As instructional designers, we are often tasked with creating “satisfying” educational and learning experiences. We take for granted that education… Read More

One of my most formative television/film experiences was the television miniseries adaptation of Anne of Green Gables (Sullivan Entertainment, 1985), based on the book of the same name (1908) by Lucy Maud Montgomery. Set on Prince Edward Island in the first decade of the 1900s, Anne of Green Gables follows the adventures of Anne Shirley,… Read More

Theories of Consciousness As a philosopher, educator, and instructional designer, I find it worthwhile to explore competing theories about the nature of consciousness and their consequences for education and instructional design. Very quickly, the major categories of theories of consciousness are as follows: Mind-Body Dualism: The mind is nonphysical and distinct from the body or… Read More

Education as Habit Formation

By Zachary Fruhling April 9, 2018

The history of philosophy offers several competing views on the nature of education, from Plato’s account of knowledge as the grasping of eternal and unchanging forms, to William James’s view that knowledge should make some pragmatic difference in the world without being too abstract. The antiquity of a specific theory of education makes no difference… Read More