Pros and Cons

Child in an inclusive education classroom setting.

Inclusive Education: What It Means, Proven Strategies, and a Case Study

By Lilla Dale McManis, PhD November 20, 2017

Considering the potential of inclusive education at your school? Perhaps you are currently working in an inclusive classroom and looking for effective strategies. Lean into this deep-dive article on inclusive education to gather a solid understanding of what it means, what the research shows, and proven strategies that bring out the benefits for everyone. What… Read More

For the second year in a row, my daughter launched a full-fledged campaign against standardized testing. About a week before the tests began, she argued they were ineffective and unfair. She echoed the concerns of a variety of students, parents and teachers: It’s a bad measure, it’s stressful, it doesn’t influence grades, it takes too… Read More

Teaching is one of the rare careers where it’s still common to stay in the same profession — possibly even in the same school — for a good portion of your career. For some teachers, this stability is part of the appeal. But for others, there comes a point where the joy is gone and… Read More

Many urban school districts have adopted a portfolio approach that allows open enrollment to foster free-market competition between neighborhood schools and specialized charter schools. A leader in urban school reform, Denver Public Schools has worked hard to expand charter school offerings in hopes that their investment will yield positive results in student performance. 18 percent of… Read More

In part one of my examination of events and trends that either help or hurt education, I discussed recent court rulings and the growing number of parents and students who opt out of standardized testing. One of the biggest education stories in the last year was about reforms to No Child Left Behind (NCLB), the… Read More

Last December, I wrote an article anticipating the addition of 20 percent time projects to my freshman English courses. While I’d read Dan Pink’s “Drive” and appreciated his comments on the importance of autonomy, mastery, and purpose, I was still incredibly anxious about handing a huge amount of time back to students and worried that… Read More

Why Some Schools are Rethinking Grading and Evaluation

By The Editorial Team February 3, 2015

Most schools follow standard grading systems, with a letter scale of A through F, and a corresponding numerical value used to calculate students’ grade point averages. Although this system helps us to understand and track student performance on a universal scale, there are some drawbacks to the method. Some critics argue that assigning numerical or… Read More

The majority of America’s educational resources are focused on students inside classrooms. However, there is a growing population of young people who may never, or only partially, engage in formal schooling. The number of homeschooled students is small but growing In 2012, the U.S. Department of Education reported that about 3.4 percent of all age-eligible… Read More

Just as everyone has a unique fingerprint, every student has an individual learning style. Chances are, not all of your students grasp a subject in the same way or share the same level of ability. So how can you better deliver your lessons to reach everyone in class? Consider differentiated instruction—a method you may have… Read More

Ending the Homework Debate: Expert Advice on What Works

By Monica Fuglei November 28, 2013

After exploring the case against homework as well as the ways homework benefits students, it’s clear that both sides have valid arguments. After examining the evidence, we’ve come up with recommendations for both teachers and parents for homework that contributes to students’ academic growth. What kind of homework is beneficial? While some research points to… Read More

The Homework Debate: How Homework Benefits Students

By Monica Fuglei November 21, 2013

This post has been updated as of December 2017. In another of our blog posts, The Case Against Homework, we articulated several points of view against homework as standard practice for teachers. However, a variety of lessons, content-related and beyond, can be taught or reinforced through homework and are worth exploring. Read on! Four ways homework… Read More

The Homework Debate: The Case Against Homework

By Monica Fuglei November 14, 2013

This post has been updated as of December 2017. It’s not uncommon to hear students, parents, and even some teachers always complaining about homework. Why, then, is homework an inescapable part of the student experience? Worksheets, busy work, and reading assignments continue to be a mainstay of students’ evenings. Whether from habit or comparison with… Read More

This post has been updated as of December 2017. Educators often debate the merits of the cooperative classroom against those of the competitive classroom. These two teaching strategies are quite different—even oppositional—and advocates on both sides of the debate passionately defend the benefits of their preferred classroom style. What is the difference between a cooperative… Read More

Summative Assessment: What Teachers Need to Know

By The Editorial Team February 27, 2013

Weeks or months of study in a classroom generally culminate in a summative assessment. This refers to a test that evaluates a student’s comprehension of the material covered thus far. While other measures, such as homework and quizzes, cover potential or progress made, the essence of a summative assessment is more black and white —… Read More

Grading vs. Assessment: What's the Difference?

By The Editorial Team January 30, 2013

Since the beginning of public education, teachers have recognized the need to have a formalized way to evaluate the progress of their students. After all, how can teachers even know if their teaching methods are effective if there is no way to measure the success or failure of their students? Letter or number grades have… Read More